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On Monday, Dec.17, birders from the Franklin Bird Club will gather for our 7th year of participation in the Audubon Christmas Bird Count.  Teams are currently being set and plans made.  If you’d like to be included on one of our 5 teams for that day, contact Rita (rstcl10609@aol.com) asap.

Franklin’s History with the Christmas Count: In 2012, at the prompting of Bob Gilbert, the Franklin Bird Club applied to Audubon to be a site for the yearly count. The application included designating a circular area, 15 miles across, which was then divided among 5 teams of birders. 2012 was a practice year with CBC reports submitted to Audubon and details worked out but nothing was official.

Franklin Bird Club members have been counting ever since.  Here are our yearly results:

2012

Total number of bird species:  57

Total number of birds:  3323

Total number of birders:  21

2013

Total number of bird species:  60

Total number of birds:  6427 + 60,000 robins

Total number of birders:  31

2014

Total number of bird species:  64

Total number of birds: 6196

Total number of birders:  30

2015

Total number of bird species:  65

Total number of birds:  3420

Total number of birders:  27

2016

Total number of bird species:  71

Total number of birds:  5596

Total number of birders:  34

2017

Total number of bird species:  64

Total number of birds:  3634

Total number of birders:  25

2018–What will this year bring?  Join us to find out (or watch for results on this website.)

Did You Know? The Audubon Christmas Bird Count began 115 years ago. The count was in response to the popular holiday activity of seeing how many birds a person could shoot in one day. Beginning on Christmas in 1900, birder Frank Chapman proposed a new tradition of counting birds rather than hunting them. Today, birds are counted by thousands of birding enthusiasts throughout the Americas. According to the Audubon Society, “Audubon and other organizations use data collected in this longest-running wildlife census to assess the health of bird populations – and to help guide conservation action.”

 

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