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5/14–Blue Ridge Parkway with John & Cathy Sill

This year’s spring bird walks with the Sills have been greatly enjoyed by all who attended. But this final walk tested their birding skills and determination under some adverse weather conditions.

Comments:     Balsam Gap to Graveyard Fields plus road to Black Balsam Campground.  Very windy and cold at first.  Except for a brief burst of activity at the Roy Taylor overlook on the way back, most birding was by ear.  Franklin Bird Club trip.
35 species

Mourning Dove  2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Broad-winged Hawk  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Blue-headed Vireo  7
Red-eyed Vireo  1
American Crow  8
Common Raven  1
Brown Creeper  1
Winter Wren  2
Carolina Wren  1
Golden-crowned Kinglet  7
Veery  3
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  3
American Goldfinch  2
Dark-eyed Junco  6
Song Sparrow  1
Eastern Towhee  5
Ovenbird  5
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  5
Hooded Warbler  1
Northern Parula  3
Blackburnian Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  11
Black-throated Blue Warbler  3
Black-throated Green Warbler  5
Canada Warbler  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  1

Walnut Gap 5/8

As always, thanks to Jim & Ellen Shelton for their warm hospitality in sharing their beautiful neighborhood.

Jim & Ellen
  1. Ellen Shelton says: Jim and I were happy to host 19 other birders this morning in our Walnut Gap neighborhood. We drove and walked some of our roads and together identified a total of 39 species, including several that are not frequently seen along the greenway. HIghlights included good views for all of one of our nesting Canada Warblers, male and female Scarlet Tanagers, as well as several Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and others.
    The following is a list of what we found this morning:
  2. 5 Mourning Dove
    2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
    1 Downy Woodpecker
    1 Hairy Woodpecker
    2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
    1 Least Flycatcher
    3 Eastern Phoebe
    4 Blue-headed Vireo
    5 Red-eyed Vireo
    3 Blue Jay
    1 American Crow
    1 Carolina Chickadee
    2 Tufted Titmouse
    2 White-breasted Nuthatch
    1 Veery
    2 Wood Thrush
    3 American Robin
    2 Gray Catbird
    1 Purple Finch
    5 Pine Siskin
    3 American Goldfinch
    2 Chipping Sparrow
    1 Field Sparrow
    5 Dark-eyed Junco
    2 Song Sparrow
    2 Eastern Towhee
    4 Ovenbird
    3 Black-and-white Warbler
    3 Hooded Warbler
    1 American Redstart
    2 Northern Parula
    4 Blackburnian Warbler
    2 Chestnut-sided Warbler
    3 Black-throated Blue Warbler
    1 Canada Warbler
    4 Scarlet Tanager
    2 Northern Cardinal
    4 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
    2 Indigo Bunting 
  3. Number of Taxa: 39

Thanks, Tim!

Standing Indian 4/29

Thanks to John and Cathy for a beautiful morning of birding.

Black and White Warbler–TC
Blue-headed Vireo–TC
Indigo Bunting–TC

  1. Ellen Shelton says: Cathy and John Sill led another walk for the Franklin Bird Club today, April 29, at the Standing Indian area. Fourteen of us joined the Sills. With their excellent spotting abilities we identified a total of 43 species today. The following is a list of what was seen and hear this morning:
  2. 1 Eurasian Collared-Dove
    1 Mourning Dove
    1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
    1 Turkey Vulture
    1 Red-tailed Hawk
    1 Belted Kingfisher
    3 Pileated Woodpecker
    1 Least Flycatcher
    2 Eastern Phoebe
    7 Blue-headed Vireo
    5 Red-eyed Vireo
    4 Blue Jay
    4 American Crow
    1 Common Raven
    1 Carolina Chickadee
    3 Tufted Titmouse
    1 Carolina Wren
    1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
    1 Veery
    3 Wood Thrush
    1 American Robin
    1 Gray Catbird
    1 Brown Thrasher
    2 Northern Mockingbird
    7 American Goldfinch
    2 Dark-eyed Junco
    3 Song Sparrow
    2 Eastern Towhee
    1 Red-winged Blackbird
    7 Ovenbird
    2 Blue-winged Warbler
    2 Black-and-white Warbler
    1 Common Yellowthroat
    5 Hooded Warbler
    3 American Redstart
    7 Northern Parula
    4 Blackburnian Warbler
    6 Chestnut-sided Warbler
    4 Black-throated Blue Warbler
    1 Northern Cardinal
    1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
    4 Indigo Bunting 
  3. Our next Greenway walk will be Wed. May 1 at Big Bear shelter area at 8:00. The following week we will have a walk at the Shelton’s in the Walnut Gap area on May 8, instead of the Greenway walk. Meet at the Bi-Lo parking lot at 8:00 to carpool. If you have not signed up for this walk and wish to attend, please call 828-524-5234.

Junaluska 2/8

Posted by fbcb1102/10/2019Home

Thanks to John and Cathy Sill for a great morning bird walk at Lake Junaluska on Thursday, Feb. 8. The day felt like early spring, which made birding all the more enjoyable. More than 20 birders joined the Sills, primarily spotting a variety of ducks wintering at Junaluska.

Coots/sf
Ring-necked duck/kl
Canvasback/sf
Bufflehead/kl
Mute Swan/kl
Bald Eagle/sf

One thought on “Junaluska”

  1. Larry Thompson says:02/11/2019 at 10:16 am EditDo you have a checklist of birds recorded at Lake J on 2/8/2019? If so can you post it?
    Thanks
:)
Location
Lake Junaluska, Haywood County, North Carolina, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:30 AM

Protocol:TravelingParty Size:15Duration:2 hour(s), 20 minute(s)Distance:2.5 mile(s)Observers:Sue Peters-Ferree

Species
20 species (+2 other taxa) total
5Domestic goose sp. (Domestic type)
25Canada Goose
9Mute Swan
3Mallard (Domestic type)
7Canvasback
2Redhead
10Ring-necked Duck
10Bufflehead
1Hooded Merganser
50Ruddy Duck
5Pied-billed Grebe
50American Coot
2Bald EagleAlso received first hand report of sighting of adults and baby earlier in the morning
1Blue Jay
3American Crow
1Carolina Chickadee
1Tufted Titmouse
3Eastern Bluebird
1White-throated Sparrow
1Song Sparrow
1Eastern Towhee
2Northern Cardinal

2 thoughts on “Spring Walks 2019

  1. Jim and I were happy to host 19 other birders this morning in our Walnut Gap neighborhood. We drove and walked some of our roads and together identified a total of 39 species, including several that are not frequently seen along the greenway. HIghlights included good views for all of one of our nesting Canada Warblers, male and female Scarlet Tanagers, as well as several Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and others.
    The following is a list of what we found this morning:

    5 Mourning Dove
    2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
    1 Downy Woodpecker
    1 Hairy Woodpecker
    2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
    1 Least Flycatcher
    3 Eastern Phoebe
    4 Blue-headed Vireo
    5 Red-eyed Vireo
    3 Blue Jay
    1 American Crow
    1 Carolina Chickadee
    2 Tufted Titmouse
    2 White-breasted Nuthatch
    1 Veery
    2 Wood Thrush
    3 American Robin
    2 Gray Catbird
    1 Purple Finch
    5 Pine Siskin
    3 American Goldfinch
    2 Chipping Sparrow
    1 Field Sparrow
    5 Dark-eyed Junco
    2 Song Sparrow
    2 Eastern Towhee
    4 Ovenbird
    3 Black-and-white Warbler
    3 Hooded Warbler
    1 American Redstart
    2 Northern Parula
    4 Blackburnian Warbler
    2 Chestnut-sided Warbler
    3 Black-throated Blue Warbler
    1 Canada Warbler
    4 Scarlet Tanager
    2 Northern Cardinal
    4 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
    2 Indigo Bunting

    Number of Taxa: 39

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